MULTIPLE HORDEOLA AND PRESEPTAL CELLULITIS FOLLOWING PERMANENT EYELINER TATTOO

TitleMULTIPLE HORDEOLA AND PRESEPTAL CELLULITIS FOLLOWING PERMANENT EYELINER TATTOO
Author, Co-AuthorDanica Marrelli
Topic
Year
2007
Day
Friday
Program Number
075308
Room
Affiliation
University of Houston, College of Optometry
AbstractBACKGROUND: Permanent eyeliner tattoo (aka blepharopigmentation, micropigmentation) is a cosmetic procedure in which pigment is deposited along the eyelash line. Originally performed by physicians, the procedure is now commonly performed by non-medical personnel, e.g. cosmetologists. A variety of complications can arise from the procedure. A case of bilateral multiple hordeola and preseptal cellulitis following permanent eyeliner is presented.

CASE REPORT(S): A 28 year old Hispanic female presented with a chief complaint of severe pain, swelling, and redness of the upper and lower eyelids of both eyes. The symptoms had onset 3 days following application of permanent eyeliner, eyebrow, and lip pigmentation (tattoo). The patient had no significant ocular or medical history. Examination revealed visual acuity of 20/20 in each eye. Extraocular motility, color vision, and pupil function were normal. Body temperature was 98.2 F. Gross examination revealed bilateral eyelid edema and erythema, with swelling extending inferiorly through the right cheek. There were no apparent problems at the lip or eyebrow tattoo sites. Slit lamp examination revealed multiple external hordeola, and a clear conjunctiva, cornea, and anterior chamber. The optic nerve was normal, without disc edema, in each eye. The patient was diagnosed with multiple hordeola OU and preseptal cellulitis OD. She was treated with oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (Augmentin)for 10 days, with complete resolution of the condition.

CONCLUSIONS: Complications may occur following eyeliner "tattoo" procedures. Although most commonly cited are allergic/granulomatous reactions, other reported complications include eyelid necrosis, cicatricial entropion, and inoculation/infectious complications. The optometrist should be familiar with the potential risks involved with this procedure in order to counsel patients and to manage any complications that arise.
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline